President Obama meets with members of his national security team and cybersecurity advisers in February. Homeland security adviser Lisa Monaco and Office of Management and Budget Director Shaun Donovan are at right. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

The M-PESA agent who works in this shop is part of a vast network of small-time vendors. Screengrab by NPR/YouTube hide caption

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Screengrab by NPR/YouTube

Dial M For Money: Can Mobile Banking Lift People Out Of Poverty?

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A sign in Washington, D.C., says "No matter where you're from, we're glad you're our neighbor," in three languages. It's a message that began at a church in Harrisonburg, Va., and is spreading to communities across the country. Courtesy of Drew Schneider hide caption

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Courtesy of Drew Schneider

South Korea's President Park Geun-Hye attends an emergency Cabinet meeting on Friday in Seoul. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

South Korea Impeaches President, But Political Drama Isn't Finished

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South Korean President Park Geun-hye is shown during a Nov. 29 televised address. The country's first female leader was impeached on Friday. AP hide caption

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AP

South Korean Lawmakers Vote Overwhelmingly To Impeach President

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Donald Trump attends a Celebrity Apprentice red carpet event on Feb. 3, 2015, at Trump Tower in New York City. Andrew H. Walker/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew H. Walker/Getty Images

Syrian pro-government forces stand amidst the rubble in old Aleppo's Jdeideh neighborhood on Friday. George Ourfalian/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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George Ourfalian/AFP/Getty Images

Horror In Aleppo: Civilians Trapped As Syrian Government Tightens Siege

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Monkeys' vocal equipment can produce the sounds of human speech, research shows, but they lack the connections between the auditory and motor parts of the brain that humans rely on to imitate words. Brian Jefferey Beggerly/Flickr hide caption

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Brian Jefferey Beggerly/Flickr

Monkey Voice Simulation Saying "Will You Marry Me?"

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Russia's new Iskander system can be armed with nuclear warheads and can fire either ballistic (pictured) or cruise missiles. The Iskander-M missile launcher was used during a military exercise last month by the Russian Eastern Military District's 5th army at a firing range in Ussuriysk, Russia. Yuri Smityuk/TASS via Getty Images hide caption

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Yuri Smityuk/TASS via Getty Images

Members of the media read through the pages of Richard McLaren's report looking into doping in Russian athletics, ahead of a press conference Friday in central London. Adrian Dennis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Adrian Dennis/AFP/Getty Images

Since winning the election, Donald Trump has faced numerous questions about the conflicts of interest posed by his vast business interests. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Poll: Trump Needs To Choose Between Presidency And His Business

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Dutch parliament member Geert Wilders speaks last month in court in Schiphol, Netherlands, during the last day of his hate speech trial. Robin Van Lonkhuijsen /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Robin Van Lonkhuijsen /AFP/Getty Images