Taylor Hutchinson says having subsidized health care costs has been critical to being able to start a farm with her partner, Jake Mendell. Kathleen Masterson/Vermont Public Radio hide caption

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Kathleen Masterson/Vermont Public Radio

Many of the Japanese Americans incarcerated at Tule Lake had been farmers before the war. At camp, they were employed as field workers, often for $12 a month. Here, incarcerees work in a carrot field. Densho: The Japanese American Legacy Project via The National Archives hide caption

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Densho: The Japanese American Legacy Project via The National Archives

'Princess Pamela's Soul Food Cookbook' Comes Back After Falling Out Of Print

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How 'Cheap Eats' Affect The People Who Make And Serve The Food

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Tom Willey has farmed for decades in California's Central Valley. His farm, T&D Willey Farms, is in the process of being taken over by Food Commons Fresno. Willey plans to still help, advise and mentor. Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio hide caption

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Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio

As California's Organic Farming Pioneers Age, A Younger Generation Steps In

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New Guidelines Seek To Provide Clarity On Food Expiration Dates

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Driscoll's, the largest berry producer in the world, now grows about the same quantity of raspberries and strawberries in Mexico as it does in California. Many American producers have recently expanded their production to Mexico. Mike Mozart/Flickr hide caption

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Mike Mozart/Flickr

Why Ditching NAFTA Could Hurt America's Farmers More Than Mexico's

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Freda DeKnight was Ebony's first food editor and author of a best-selling African-American cookbook in the 1940s. Her recipes presented a vision of black America that was often invisible in mainstream media. Sierra Nicole Rhoden/Chicago Tribune hide caption

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Sierra Nicole Rhoden/Chicago Tribune

Beekeepers Glen Andresen and Tim Wessels are trying to breed a honey bee that is more resilient to colder climates. Kathryn Boyd-Batstone/Oregon Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Kathryn Boyd-Batstone/Oregon Public Broadcasting

A street vendor makes huaraches and quesadillas on the sidewalk in the piñata district in Los Angeles. LA is the only major U.S. city where selling food on the sidewalk is illegal. President Trump's immigration policies have pushed the city council to change the law. But the devil is in the details. Camellia Tse for NPR hide caption

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Camellia Tse for NPR

"Sell by" and "expiration" labels on food products may contribute to food waste by misleading consumers to throwing away perfectly good food. Now, two food industry associations are encouraging food companies to do away with these labels. Ryan Eskalis/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Eskalis/NPR

Chef José Andrés will shutter five of his restaurants on Thursday as part of a boycott in response to President Trump's immigration policies. Beth J. Harpaz/AP hide caption

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Beth J. Harpaz/AP

Chef José Andrés To Close Restaurants For The 'Day Without Immigrants'

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Anchoveta are processed at a fish meal factory in Lima, Peru in 2009. Peru and Chile have the world's largest anchoveta fishery, making them the world's largest producers of fish for fishmeal. Ernesto Benavides/Getty Images hide caption

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Ernesto Benavides/Getty Images