How Chickens Shifted From Sacred To Diet Staple

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Customers at Puzzles Bakery & Café in Schenectady, N.Y. More than half the staff at the café has a developmental disability. Rhitu Chatterjee/NPR hide caption

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Rhitu Chatterjee/NPR

For People With Developmental Disabilities, Food Work Means More Self Reliance

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The puffy taco with beef from Rays Drive-In in San Antonio is a standout for Sutter, but the year has just begun. San Antonio Express-News hide caption

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San Antonio Express-News

This Food Critic Will Take The Taco. Again. And Again. And Again.

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Helen Dahlke, a scientist from the University of California, Davis, stands in an almond orchard outside Modesto that's being deliberately flooded. This experiment is examining how flooding farmland in the winter can help replenish the state's depleted aquifers. Joe Proudman/Joe Proudman / Courtesy of UC Davis hide caption

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Joe Proudman/Joe Proudman / Courtesy of UC Davis

As Rains Soak California, Farmers Test How To Store Water Underground

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Marie-Antoine Carême began his hardscrabble life in Paris during the French Revolution, but eventually his penchant for design and his baking talent brought him fame and fortune. Wikipedia hide caption

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Wikipedia

David Fuller has been a dairy farmer since 1977. He gets about the same amount of money for milk these days he did when he started. Rebecca Sananes/Vermont Public Radio hide caption

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Rebecca Sananes/Vermont Public Radio

Nonperishable food is restocked in Maggie Ballard's "blessing box" in Wichita, Kan., several times a day. Deborah Shaar/KMUW hide caption

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Deborah Shaar/KMUW

A New Type Of Food Pantry Is Sprouting In Yards Across America

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This 52-million-year-old fossilized tomatillo was found in Patagonia, Argentina, shedding light on the origin of nightshade plants. In this specimen, the slender stalk is preserved, and the former papery and lobed husk is broken at top to reveal the large, fleshy berry underneath — now turned to coal. Peter Wilf, Penn State University hide caption

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Peter Wilf, Penn State University

Dungeness crabs for sale at Fisherman's Wharf in San Francisco. California's Dungeness crab season was shut down in 2015, when record high ocean temperatures and lingering toxic algae blooms raised the domoic acid in shellfish to unsafe levels. A new study links dangerously high levels of the neurotoxin to warmer ocean temperatures, suggesting such closures could become more common in the future. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

A Venezuelan soldier watches over cargo trucks leaving the port in Puerto Cabello, which handles the majority of the country's food imports. Across the chain of command, from high-level generals to the lowest foot soldiers, military officials are using their growing power over the food supply to siphon off wealth for themselves. Ricardo Nunes/AP hide caption

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Ricardo Nunes/AP

As Venezuelans Go Hungry, The Military Is Trafficking In Food

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A prehistoric granary overlooking Cedar Mesa, a site inside the newly created Bears Ears National Monument in Utah that is sacred to many Native American tribes. Natives still hunt and forage for food and medicine throughout the Bears Ears region. Josh Ewing/Courtesy of Bears Ears Inter-Tribal Coalition hide caption

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Josh Ewing/Courtesy of Bears Ears Inter-Tribal Coalition

Colorado-based Dram Apothecary makes an evergreen syrup from local trees that can be used for both alcoholic and nonalcoholic beverages. Kelly Ishikawa/Courtesy of Dram Apothecary hide caption

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Kelly Ishikawa/Courtesy of Dram Apothecary

This shark may look menacing, but sautee it and drizzle some lemon caper sauce on top, and this dogfish becomes doggone delicious. Ben de la Cruz/NPR hide caption

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Ben de la Cruz/NPR

Would You Eat This Fish? A Shark Called Dogfish Makes A Tasty Taco

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On the north side of Detroit, a community farm teamed up with a local arts and culture nonprofit to put its summer harvest to best use — while also honoring the legacy of the city's black families. Their answer: Afro Jam, a line of preserves based on old family recipes. Martina Guzman for NPR hide caption

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Martina Guzman for NPR

Kiyoshi Kimura (center) poses with the Pacific bluefin tuna he won for about $632,000 at the Tsukiji fish market's annual New Year auction. The fish weighs about 466 pounds. Eugene Hoshiko/AP hide caption

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Eugene Hoshiko/AP