Feral hogs in Great Smoky Mountains National Park are an invasive and hugely destructive species. Courtesy of Bill Lea hide caption

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On The Trail Of The Wily Wild Hog
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Andrew Heineman's twin brother, Marcus, pulls a cultivator across a different field where they will plant seed corn this year, another alternative they selected when the price of corn started to fall and a new seed corn plant opened up nearby. Amy Mayer/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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To Survive The Bust Cycle, Farmers Go Back To Business-School Basics
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Feeling Foggy? Japanese Raisin Is Good For What 'Ales' You
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In A Lawsuit, New York Accuses Domino's Pizza Of Wage Theft
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Patricia Gallagher (from left), who first proposed the tasting; wine merchant Steven Spurrier; and influential French wine editor Odette Kahn. After the results were announced, Kahn is said to have demanded her scorecard back. "She wanted to make sure that the world didn't know what her scores were," says George Taber, the only journalist present that day. Courtesy of Bella Spurrier hide caption

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The Judgment Of Paris: The Blind Taste Test That Decanted The Wine World
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Chinese and other Asian beer brands on display at a supermarket. An ancient brewery discovered in China's Central Plain shows the Chinese were making barley beer with fairly advanced techniques some 5,000 years ago. Chris/Flickr hide caption

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A typical label includes safe cooking instructions. This label on blade-tenderized beef sold at Costco recommends 160 degrees as the minimum internal temperature, which doesn't require a three-minute rest time. Lydia Zuraw/KHN for NPR hide caption

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Coming soon: The redesigned nutrition facts label will highlight added sugars in food. The label also will display calories per serving, and serving size, more prominently. U.S. Food and Drug Administration hide caption

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One of musician-turned-chef Philip Gelb's culinary creations for his Sound & Savor series of dinners and concerts. It's a mezze plate of falafel, roasted garlic hummus, beet nut pate, pepper pecan sauce and socca, a thin pancake made of chickpea flour. Hannah Kaminsky hide caption

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Willard Middle School students chop carrots for a meal they will sell through Josephine. Teresa Chin/Youth Radio hide caption

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Why One Startup Is Offering Meals Made By Home Cooks And Middle-Schoolers
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Chefs cook vegetables that will be added to a giant, 7-foot-wide platter of paella. The dish, made from produce diverted from the dump, was served up as part of a free feast for 5,000 in Washington, D.C., Wednesday to raise awareness about food waste. Morgan McCloy/NPR hide caption

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Florida Citrus Farmers Abandon 'Grove Graveyards' In Battle For Survival
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Guy Davies, an inspector of the Florida Division of Plant Industry, shows an orange that is showing signs of "citrus greening." The disease is caused by a bacterium carried by the Asian citrus psyllid. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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