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Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., right, and Rick Santorum, former senator from Pennsylvania, listen during a health reform news conference on Capitol Hill last week. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Latest GOP Effort To Replace ACA Could End Health Care For Millions

Republicans are taking one last shot at repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. But the new plan isn't much different than the last one that failed.

Scott Collins' and his family returned to the southern edge of Marathon Key to find their home devastated. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

PHOTOS: Keys Residents Face Devastated Homes, No Power And A Slow Recovery

"I can make jokes," Laura Welliver says, "because I've already had my good, long cry."

PHOTOS: Keys Residents Face Devastated Homes, No Power And A Slow Recovery

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Nursing homes are required to have emergency plans and have staff practice evacuations, but many fail to meet even those basic requirements. Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Many Nursing Homes Aren't Prepared For Even Basic Emergencies

Kaiser Health News

The deaths of eight residents in a Florida nursing home showed how even seemingly mundane things like failing to maintain climate control can be deadly. Emergency preparation enforcement can be lax.

A burned-out Georgia Tech police vehicle sits on a truck outside a police station on the Atlanta campus on Monday night. The car was allegedly set ablaze by people protesting against a deadly police shooting of a Georgia Tech student Saturday. Kevin D. Liles/AP hide caption

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Kevin D. Liles/AP

Days After Police Shooting, 3 Arrested Amid Violence At Georgia Tech Vigil

By Monday's end, three people had been arrested and two officers were recovering from minor injuries. The unrest comes after an LGBTQ campus leader was shot and killed in a confrontation with police.

Martin Schulz, former president of the European Parliament, speaks during an campaign event in Potsdam, eastern Germany, on Sept. 15. He is Chancellor Angela Merkel's main challenger in Germany's upcoming federal elections. Steffi Loos/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Steffi Loos/AFP/Getty Images

Once A Contender, Angela Merkel's Main Rival Stumbles As Election Approaches

Martin Schulz's main handicap is that his party spent eight of the last 12 years in coalition with the German chancellor's party, and their policies are barely distinguishable from each other.

Melisande Short-Colomb, 63, is a descendant of slaves sold by the Jesuits to fund Georgetown University. She's enrolled as a freshman there and plans to major in African-American studies. Marvin Joseph/Getty Images hide caption

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Marvin Joseph/Getty Images

Starting School At The University That Enslaved Her Ancestors

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talked to Mélisande Short-Colomb, whose family was once enslaved by Georgetown University. Now, at 63, Short-Colomb has enrolled as a freshman there.

Starting School At The University That Enslaved Her Ancestors

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The Phi Kappa Psi fraternity house is seen on the University of Virginia campus in Charlottesville, Va., in 2014. Three graduates of U.Va. have won the right to sue Rolling Stone magazine for defamation over a now-retracted article alleging that fraternity members perpetrated a horrific gang rape. Jay Paul/Getty Images hide caption

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Jay Paul/Getty Images

Fraternity Members' Defamation Case Against 'Rolling Stone' Can Proceed, Court Says

A U.S. appeals court says three members of the Phi Kappa Psi fraternity have a plausible case that they were implicated in a now-retracted story about an alleged gang rape at U.Va.

Meghan Downey, 22, a recent graduate from the College of William & Mary, reacts outside an Arlington, Va. auditorium after Education Secretary Betsy DeVos spoke about campus sexual assault. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Is There A 'Better Way' To Handle Campus Sexual Assault?

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos may be using some compromise plans devised by outside groups as a model for balancing the rights of alleged victims and accused students.

Is There A 'Better Way' To Handle Campus Sexual Assault?

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Ellen Pao is a tech investor, co-founder of inclusion nonprofit Project Include, and former Reddit CEO. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Silicon Valley's Ellen Pao Tackles Sex Discrimination, Workplace Diversity In Memoir

The tech investor dives into the lawsuit that thrust her into the national spotlight and the workplace conditions that prompted it. She says firms are largely applying "tepid diversity solutions."

Silicon Valley's Ellen Pao Tackles Sex Discrimination, Workplace Diversity In Memoir

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A map in Where the Animals Go shows how baboons move near the Mpala Research Centre in Kenya, as tracked by anthropologist Margaret Crofoot and her colleagues in 2012. Margaret Crofoot, University of California, Davis; Damien Farine, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology /Courtesy of Oliver Uberti hide caption

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Margaret Crofoot, University of California, Davis; Damien Farine, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology /Courtesy of Oliver Uberti

The Science And Art Of Mapping Animal Movements

Technology allows mapping of wildlife movements with new precision — and a fresh approach to conservation — as evidenced by Where the Animals Go, released Tuesday in the U.S., says Barbara J. King.

A strengthening global economy is among the most important forces putting downward pressure on the dollar. agcuesta/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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agcuesta/Getty Images/iStockphoto

The Dollar Is Weaker, But That May Not Be A Bad Thing

The dollar is down nearly 10 percent since the beginning of the year. That's bad news if you're a tourist traveling to Europe but great news if your U.S. company sells goods overseas.

The Dollar Is Weaker, But That Might Not Be A Bad Thing

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Oysters, shown out of their shell, collect tiny plastic particles while in the water. These microplastics can eventually make their way into your dinner. Ken Christensen/KCTS Television hide caption

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Ken Christensen/KCTS Television

Guess What's Showing Up In Our Shellfish? One Word: Plastics

EarthFix

Scientists predict that plastic in the ocean will eventually outweigh the fish there. Where is it all coming from? And is it making our food unsafe? Researchers are trying to find the answers.

Phil Schiller, Apple's senior vice president of worldwide marketing, announces features of the new iPhone X on Sept. 12 at the Steve Jobs Theater on the new Apple campus in Cupertino, Calif. The phone's new ability to unlock itself using a scan of its owners face inspired a strong, divided reaction. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

iPhone X's Face ID Inspires Privacy Worries — But Convenience May Trump Them

Advocates are concerned facial scan data could be stolen, or that a successful rollout could make consumers more comfortable with less innocuous, less accurate uses of facial recognition technology.

iPhone X's Face ID Inspires Privacy Worries — But Convenience May Trump Them

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The Grand Opening last month of the new Toys 'R' Us Times Square Holiday Shop in New York City. The largest U.S. toy store chain filed for bankruptcy protection late Monday. Most stores are operating as usual. Bennett Raglin/Getty Images for Toys hide caption

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Bennett Raglin/Getty Images for Toys

Ahead Of The Holiday Season, Toys R Us Files For Bankruptcy Protection

The largest U.S. toy chain filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection late Monday. Toys R Us plans to use $3 billion in bankruptcy financing to buy merchandise from vendors and fund operations.

Hillary Clinton waves outside the Fresh Air studio in Philadelphia on Sept. 14, 2017. Courtesy of Jessica Kourkounis hide caption

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Courtesy of Jessica Kourkounis

Clinton Won't Rule Out Questioning 2016 Election, But Says No Clear Means To Do So

Fresh Air

Hillary Clinton tells Fresh Air the mechanism for such a challenge does not exist in the U.S., "and usually we don't need it." She also says she is "optimistic about our country, but I am not naïve."

Clinton Won't Rule Out Questioning 2016 Election, But Says No Clear Means To Do So

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