A waiter carries beers at the Theresienwiese fair grounds of the Oktoberfest beer festival in Munich, southern Germany, last September. For centuries, a German law has stipulated that beer can only be made from four ingredients. But as Germany embraces craft beer, some believe the law impedes good brewing. Karl-Josef Hildenbrand/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The Salt

Germany's Beer Purity Law Is 500 Years Old. Is It Past Its Sell-By Date?

For centuries, German law has stipulated that beer can be made only from four ingredients. But as the country embraces craft beer, some believe the law impedes good brewing.

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Arts & Life

A Glimpse Of Listeners' #NPRpoetry — From The Punny To The Profound

It was a simple idea: Would you, our listeners, tweet us poems for National Poetry Month? Your response contained multitudes — haiku, lyrics, even one 8-year-old's ode to her dad's bald spot.

Lily Sciacca, 8, reads her poem about her dad
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Sharon Long in her workshop. Courtesy of Sharon Long hide caption

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StoryCorps

Reborn At 40, She Uncovered New Life In A 'Dream' — Looking At Skulls

But not just looking at skulls — reconstructing human faces from them. This forensic artist once worked several jobs, hating "every morning I got up." Then, she took a class in anthropology.

Reborn At 40, She Uncovered New Life In A 'Dream' — Looking At Skulls
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Theresa Mondale, a broker with United Country Real Estate in western Montana, says her sales of off-grid, "survivalist" properties have risen by 50 percent over the last several years. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Around the Nation

In The Rural Northwest, A Growing Market For Survivalist Homes

A Montana couple is looking to meet a growing demand in the real estate business, at least in the rural Northwest: off-grid properties that include bunkers and secret rooms.

In The Rural Northwest, A Growing Market For Survivalist Homes
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Mary Chapin Carpenter's new album, The Things That We Are Made Of, comes out May 6. Aaron Farrington/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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First Listen

Preview The New Mary Chapin Carpenter Album, 'The Things That We Are Made Of'

On her 14th album, a collaboration with top producer Dave Cobb, the country veteran traces her memories while still looking toward the unknown.

The Things That We Are Made Of
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    The Things That We Are Made Of
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    The Things That We Are Made Of
    Artist
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    Lambent Light Records
    Released
    2016

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The robotic skull of a T-600 cyborg used in the movie Terminator 3. Eduardo Parra/Getty Images hide caption

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All Tech Considered

Weighing The Good And The Bad Of Autonomous Killer Robots In Battle

It sounds like science fiction, but it's a very real and contentious debate that is making its way through the U.N. Advocates of a ban want all military weapons to be under "meaningful human control."

Weighing The Good And The Bad Of Autonomous Killer Robots In Battle
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"This is the best chance in a generation to reform our federal drug sentencing law," Sen. Richard Durbin (center) said Thursday. He and other lawmakers held a news conference about proposed criminal sentencing reform legislation. Al Drago/CQ-Roll Call,Inc. hide caption

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Politics

One Last Push In Congress To Change Punishment For Drug Crimes This Year

A bipartisan group of senators has spent three years hashing out a proposal to reduce mandatory minimum prison terms for many nonviolent crimes.

Chobani CEO Hamdi Ulukaya (left) presents an employee with shares of the company at the Chobani plant in New Berlin, N.Y., on Tuesday. Johannes Arlt hide caption

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The Salt

Why Chobani Gave Employees A Financial Stake In Company's Future

Workers at the yogurt-maker got a potential windfall when the company said it would give them shares that could be worth up to 10 percent of the firm. The move reflects a rising trend in employee ownership.

Why Chobani Gave Employees A Financial Stake In Company's Future
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Cybil Preston, chief apiary inspector for the Maryland Department of Agriculture, does a training run with Mack: She sets up fake beehives and commands him to "find." He sniffs each of them to check for American foulbrood. He has been trained to sit to notify Preston if he detects the disease. Morgan McCloy/NPR hide caption

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The Salt

Keeping Bees Safe: It's A Ruff Job, But This Doggy Detective Gets It Done

Mack is the newest addition to the Maryland Department of Agriculture's apiary inspection team. He uses his superior sniffer to find hives infected with a contagious disease that kills bee colonies.

Chinese officials answer questions about a new law regulating overseas non-governmental organizations during a press conference at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Thursday. The new law subjects NGOs to close police supervision. "We welcome and support all foreign NGOs to come to China to conduct friendly exchanges," one official said. Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

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Parallels - World News

China Passes Law Putting Foreign NGOs Under Stricter Police Control

China's legislature has passed a controversial law giving police sweeping powers to monitor and control foreign non-governmental organizations that operate in China.

China Passes Law Putting Foreign NGOs Under Stricter Police Control
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Randy Berry, the first U.S. special envoy for the rights of LGBTI persons, is shown at a gay pride rally in Sao Paulo, Brazil, last June. He says the U.S. is supporting activists worldwide but recognizes the risks they face in many countries. A gay activist who worked at the U.S. Embassy in Bangladesh was hacked to death this week. Courtesy U.S. State Department hide caption

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Parallels - World News

For State Department's LGBTI Envoy, Every Country Is A Different Challenge

Randy Berry says the U.S. is supporting activists worldwide, but is also aware of risks they face. That was driven home with the killing of a gay activist who worked at the U.S. Embassy in Bangladesh.

For State Department's LGBTI Envoy, Every Country Is A Different Challenge
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