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Aztec Gold: Watch The History And Science Of Popcorn
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'Here Come The Brides': Same-Sex Weddings Call For A New Soundtrack
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"In material like this, I hope that there is a danger in what we're doing. I hope we are on a razor's edge." Leslie Odom Jr. gets into character as Aaron Burr on the Hamilton set. Josh Lehrer hide caption

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Being Aaron Burr
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Robin Eubanks' new album, More Than Meets The Ear, is out now. Walt Denson/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Hendrix On A Horn: The World Of Robin Eubanks
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In a video from IJReview, South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham sets out to destroy his old flip phone after Donald Trump gave out his number in a campaign speech on Tuesday. IJReview/YouTube hide caption

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"Question Bridge: Black Males" attempts to represent black male identity in America via a video question-and-answer exchange. At top center is Jesse Williams, the project's executive producer. Question Bridge: Black Males hide caption

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Questioning The Black Male Experience In America
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A lot of the airborne particles in the Earth's atmosphere come from natural sources, such as desert dust (red-orange) and sea salt (blue). But there's also soot from fires (green and yellow) and sulfur emissions (white) from burning fossil fuel. William Putman/ NASA/Goddard hide caption

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