Astronaut Reid Wiseman captured this image from the International Space Station and posted it on Sept. 28, 2014, writing: "The Milky Way steals the show from Sahara sands that make the Earth glow orange," according to NASA's website. Reid Wiseman/NASA hide caption

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Reid Wiseman/NASA

Soccer midfielder Julie Foudy (right) cheers her teammate, Tiffany Roberts, during the WUSA All-Star Game in 2003. Al Bello/Getty Images hide caption

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Al Bello/Getty Images

A Message To Inspire Women To Lead: Own Your Awesome

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Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Edward Albee in 1965. Jack Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

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Jack Mitchell/Getty Images

Who's Afraid Of A Diverse Cast?

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Week In Politics: Fallout Continues Over Firing Of FBI Director Comey

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President Trump met with Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov (left) and Russian Ambassador to the U.S. Sergey Kislyak at the White House on May 10. Russian Foreign Ministry Photo via AP hide caption

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Russian Foreign Ministry Photo via AP

Part of the Linac 4 booster at CERN, as seen on May 9 in Meyrin, near Geneva. The booster will allow the LHC to reach higher luminosity in the next few years. Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tapping into millennials' compassion and activism might be the best way to motivate them to buy health coverage, says Aditi Juneja, a New York University law student. Ashley Pridmore/Courtesy of Youth Radio hide caption

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Ashley Pridmore/Courtesy of Youth Radio

Linguist Geoff Nunberg says that people often use spurious quotations to create a version of Abraham Lincoln that suit a political purpose. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Lincoln Said What? Bogus Quotations Take On A New Life On Social Media

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